0 comments on “Alzheimer’s Disease: The Slow Killer”

Alzheimer’s Disease: The Slow Killer


People are living longer nowadays than ever before. That means that people are able to experience more of life and spend more time with family. However, with old age comes to some drawbacks. Pain, medical problems and lack of energy just to name a few. Unfortunately, the worst thing may not be something you can see or feel.

What is Alzheimer’s?


 Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory. An early symptom is a difficulty remembering new information. More severe symptoms include disorientation, confusion, and behavior changes.  Many people don’t even realize that they have it, that’s why it’s vitally important that the family members recognize that signs and seek early treatment.

Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The greatest known risk factor is increasing age but it can start as early as 65. Alzheimer’s worsens over time. Late stage individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation. Alzheimer’s is actually the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Currently, Alzheimer’s has no known cure. Treatment is available for symptoms. Researchers are looking into stem cell research for possible treatment. 

What causes it?

The main thing to look at is the neurons in the brain. These nerve cells connect with each other to form communications. Some are involved in thinking and learning and others work with the senses. Their main responsibilities are to store and communicate information. Scientists aren’t sure where the problem really starts but they believe the disease prevents parts of the cells main systems from working. Just like a factory, any problem in one area affects the whole operation.  


If the damage spreads the cells will eventually lose their ability to do their job. The brain cells will eventually die, causing irreversible damage to the brain. There is a theory that plaques and tangles, protein fibers, block communication among nerve cells. These fibers are normal but they seem to develop more for people with Alzheimer’s      

0 comments on “A Mother’s Day Celebration. Thank You.”

A Mother’s Day Celebration. Thank You.

A Mother's Day Celebration

Mother’s day is a celebration. It is a celebration where mothers are honored. This modern-day tradition began in the United States in 1908 when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother at St. Andrew’s Methodist Church. Since this moment, the public observed the holiday and commercialized it.

This is a dedication to mothers around the world. It is a tribute to their incredible self. There are no words that can be said that hasn’t already been said. It is because of the mothers that many of us rely on for comfort, strength, and support. Regardless, of how old we become, our mothers are the one person who might just mean the world to us.

As a remembrance of our appreciation, thank you to the mothers of the world for what you do. You make the world better day by day. The E & S family wishes everyone a happy mother’s day.

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The 7 Stages of Dementia

Dementia Stages

Dementia is a general term for a decline in mental ability severe enough to affect daily life. Sadly, many loved ones don’t understand how it progresses or how to treat a family member with dementia.

Furthermore, it is difficult to diagnose because the symptoms vary on the cause.

General Symptoms of Dementia:

  1. Memory loss
  2. Difficulty communicating
  3. Personality changes
  4. Depression
  5. Anxiety
  6. Agitation
  7. Difficulty handling complex tasks
  8. Paranoia
  9. Agitation
  10. The difficulty with coordination and motor functions
  11. Confusion and disorientation

Generally, dementia is not a specific disease. For this reason, it is difficult to diagnose. Families who encounter loved ones with dementia will notice common patterns.

For instance, dementia describes a group of assumptions affecting memory, thinking, and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily functioning.

Stages 1- 3 of Dementia

No dementia to mild cognitive impairment. In this stage, this includes increased memory loss, trouble concentrating, and difficulty with verbal repetition.

Stage 4 of Dementia

Normally, stage 4 is considered the early-stage of dementia. It is not abnormal to see patients lose interest in other people or activities in this stage. What used to be simple tasks turn into a nightmare for those dealing with dementia.

The day to day activities is a burden to the patient. For example, patients often report misplacing items and having trouble remembering names. Patients struggle to find the right words in a conversation.

Additionally, some lose track of the day, date, or time. To sum it up, Dementia patients become self-reliant on their caretakers.

Stage 5-6 of Dementia

The mid-stage of Dementia includes problems sleeping. In summary, most report behavior problems in social settings. Dementia sufferers may wander or become lost.

In worse cases, patients complain about hallucinations and delusions. It is not uncommon that family members report increased hostility and aggression. Finally, personal information is usually difficult for sufferers to remember.

Stage 7 of Dementia

This is the late-state of dementia. In short, patients become more hostile, are vulnerable to infections, have difficulty eating, swallowing, and can lose considerable weight. To sum it up, dementia patients need absolute attention during this stage.

A single mishap creates problems for families and patients alike. Nevertheless, there is a way to alleviate the problems that are associated with dementia.

What Can Be Done About Dementia?

There is no cure for dementia. Prevention and medication assistance can ease symptoms. Home care is an alternative care treatment plan for dementia patients.

Globally, dementia affects about 46 million people. It is a concern with families everywhere. In conclusion, Dementia is not easy for families. It is a broad category of brain diseases. The most common is Alzheimer. Usually, age is the main reason a person’s notice a decline in their cognitive functions.

Regardless, the solution and treatment of dementia is a care-taking plan. While symptoms can’t be reversed, dementia patients can receive personal care plans that will assist families.

0 comments on “3 Home Health Care Jobs You Will Want”

3 Home Health Care Jobs You Will Want

Home Care Jobs You Will Want

Healthcare continues to be the largest sector for job growth for 2019. It does not look like it is stopping either. For the next ten years, Healthcare’s dominance is recession free.

In addition, there are more employment opportunities than there are skilled workers.

If you are searching for a career or a job that is quick, easy, and provides excellent benefits, look no further.

3 Home Health Care Jobs You Will Want:

3 Home Health Care Jobs
This a closer look at the 3 home health care jobs you will want.

Certified Home Health Aides

There is a crisis looming through the healthcare field. Furthermore, the problem is that the desire to have home caregivers is high, but the knowledge of how to become a Home Health Aide is lacking.

It is a field that is often underestimated. There are reasons why professional home health aides are needed more than ever.

In the state of New Jersey, home health aides earn a better wage than most retail workers, and in a respectable field.

Registered Nurses

A career is a lifelong commitment. A registered nurse is the hero of the home care industry. Nurses earn an impressive salary of $63,000 to $100,000. In other words, nurses make good money.

It is a profession that never goes out of style.

Medical Office Professionals

In the event that you prefer office work, home care is great. For instance, Medical office administrators perform various clerical support tasks. Medical office professionals understand HIPAA regulations and scheduling.

A Certified Medical Office administrator undergoes a certification program of at least 50-hours. Home health care agencies need medical administrations.