0 comments on “A Heartfelt Thank You To Veterans”

A Heartfelt Thank You To Veterans

Home Health Aides Love Graduating from E & S

This is a heartfelt thank you to Veterans. While it is a cliche thing to say, it is with genuine respect that we value your bravery, your selflessness, and your sacrifices. Your service is not what we are thanking. It is the soul behind it that we are thinking of.

It is a day where we value the fallen and current heroes. We don’t need a special holiday to remind us of their legacies. It is a day where we stop and think about what it means to the world to have courageous individuals. There is no way to envision the world without the existence of those people.

The E & S family recognizes that these people helped the world become a better place. The dedication is something to admire, respect, and more importantly honor. We are forever in your debt. The past, present, future generations thank the veterans.

0 comments on “10 Signs of Anxiety in Elderly Patients [Infographic Included]”

10 Signs of Anxiety in Elderly Patients [Infographic Included]

Your heart races before an interview. Beads of sweat form before a presentation. Anxiety sharpens our senses. It is our body’s natural flight or fight response that was used to keep us from harm. It makes it easier for us to focus on.

However, there are instances where this perfectly normal sensation can interfere with our daily lives. Anxiety is a normal sensation for most people. Studies have shown that generalized anxiety disorder is common in the elderly affecting seven percent of seniors. It affects seniors more than depression does.

It is normal for older adults to worry more. Unfortunately, anxiety can limit their daily activities or have difficulty sleeping. If untreated, anxiety can lead to depression and other conditions like phobias. The reason anxiety is misdiagnosed is because it can mimic other conditions with similar symptoms. It is the silent mental disorder that is misunderstood by the general public.

These are ten signs that your love may be suffering from anxiety.

  1. Fatigue
  2. Trembling
  3. Chest Pains
  4. Headaches
  5. Muscle Aches
  6. Difficulty Swallowing
  7. Frequent use of the bathroom
  8. Feeling out of breath
  9. Hot flashes
  10. Palpitations
Symptoms of Anxiety [Infographic]

If your loved one is suffering from any of these symptoms, it is best to go see a doctor. Anxiety is not life-threatening, and it can be managed through lifestyle changes. Nevertheless, it can cause patients to suffer from more serious mental disorders.

0 comments on “ManorHealth Care and ES Home Care Solutions Partner Up”

ManorHealth Care and ES Home Care Solutions Partner Up

ES Home Care Solutions and ManorHealth Care, located at Mountainside, New Jersey partner together to provide communities and families the care they need. They work together to find the right care for patients and families. With love and dedication, we can do it together. Families rely on us and our team or professionals.

Our Director of Nursing and their Social Services department work together to find the right care for your families. They refer clients to our home care agency because we are dependable and reliable.

Nevertheless, medical teams that work together for your family will give you the best choices.

“Families need us to be on their side. It’s important that families have a reliable resource once they leave our facility. E & S Home Care Solutions not only provide skilled training to give personalized care, but they are a fast-growing home care agency proven to give good care in local areas. It’s why we work with them,” the office administrator stated with enthusiasm. She had a great relationship and bond with the Director of Nursing at E & S Home Care Solutions.

“It has been a pleasure getting to know her. We worked together at hospice. I know this will be a valuable relationship,” Jill the Director at Nursing commented with a bubbly smile. She anticipates it will be a start to a beautiful relationship and that it will benefit the communities.

0 comments on “Alzheimer’s Disease: The Slow Killer”

Alzheimer’s Disease: The Slow Killer


People are living longer nowadays than ever before. That means that people are able to experience more of life and spend more time with family. However, with old age comes to some drawbacks. Pain, medical problems and lack of energy just to name a few. Unfortunately, the worst thing may not be something you can see or feel.

What is Alzheimer’s?


 Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that causes problems with memory. An early symptom is a difficulty remembering new information. More severe symptoms include disorientation, confusion, and behavior changes.  Many people don’t even realize that they have it, that’s why it’s vitally important that the family members recognize that signs and seek early treatment.

Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging. The greatest known risk factor is increasing age but it can start as early as 65. Alzheimer’s worsens over time. Late stage individuals lose the ability to carry on a conversation. Alzheimer’s is actually the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Currently, Alzheimer’s has no known cure. Treatment is available for symptoms. Researchers are looking into stem cell research for possible treatment. 

What causes it?

The main thing to look at is the neurons in the brain. These nerve cells connect with each other to form communications. Some are involved in thinking and learning and others work with the senses. Their main responsibilities are to store and communicate information. Scientists aren’t sure where the problem really starts but they believe the disease prevents parts of the cells main systems from working. Just like a factory, any problem in one area affects the whole operation.  


If the damage spreads the cells will eventually lose their ability to do their job. The brain cells will eventually die, causing irreversible damage to the brain. There is a theory that plaques and tangles, protein fibers, block communication among nerve cells. These fibers are normal but they seem to develop more for people with Alzheimer’s